News

20 / 03 / 2019

AHO explains the key health dangers for children

The risk of death is highest in the first month of life. Preterm birth, birth asphyxia and infections cause most newborn deaths.

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20 / 03 / 2019

AHO shocked by the Risks of Cesarean Section in Africa

In a Lancet Global Health study published on Wednesday, it found that maternal deaths following a cesarean section are 50 times higher in African countries they looked at than in the U.K. — .5 percent compared to .01 percent.

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20 / 03 / 2019

AHO to tackle noncommunicable disease in Africa through health checks

When it comes to health issues in Africa, people think of chronic hunger, or infectious diseases such as malaria or HIV/AIDS. But Africa is simultaneously struggling with an increase in noncommunicable diseases, most of them related to obesity.

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20 / 03 / 2019

AHO calls to action as children under age 5 die every minute in Africa

In 2013, an estimated 6.3 million children under five died, 2.9 million of them in Africa. This is equivalent to five children under 5 years of age dying every minute. Two thirds of these deaths can be attributed to preventable causes. A third of all these deaths are in the neonatal period.

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20 / 03 / 2019

Children are the innocent victims of TB in vulnerable communities, says AHO

Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the world’s deadliest, yet preventable, communicable diseases and remains a significant problem in Africa. Every year, there is an estimated 9 million new TB cases worldwide but consistently 3 million cases are either not diagnosed, not treated, or are diagnosed and not registered by national TB control programmes.

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20 / 03 / 2019

AHO to scale up immunisation as 1 in 5 children in Africa do not have access to life-saving vaccines

It is estimated that about three million children under five years of age die each year in Africa and a significant number of these deaths could be prevented by vaccines. Yet one in five children does not receive them. Lack of service delivery in remote areas or lack of information about the effectiveness of vaccines is a major reason many do not receive them.

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20 / 03 / 2019

AHO alarmed by rates of cervical cancer amongst African women

Cervical cancer is caused by the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV), which is the most common viral infection of the reproductive tract. It affects younger age groups as a result of early sexual activity, multiple sexual partners, and exposure to other sexually transmitted infections such as HIV.

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